The Latest

Apr 21, 2014 / 83 notes
Apr 21, 2014 / 3,968 notes
emmangs:

Des by photodre 4 on Flickr.
Apr 21, 2014 / 183 notes

emmangs:

Des by photodre 4 on Flickr.

(via blahblahbekke)

Apr 21, 2014 / 593 notes
chiefofaffections:

 
Apr 21, 2014 / 191 notes
passaxpassa:

Herieth Paul
Idk.. The Eclectic or Tam Tam Club 
Apr 21, 2014 / 331 notes

passaxpassa:

Herieth Paul

Idk.. The Eclectic or Tam Tam Club 

(via amiyak)

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Allison Reimus
Tumblr: http://allisonreimus.tumblr.com
Apr 21, 2014 / 733 notes

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Allison Reimus

Tumblr: http://allisonreimus.tumblr.com

(via marxalonzo)

ruiraiox:

John Coltrane - Ascension (Impulse!, 1966)
"The people who were in the studio were screaming," recalled alto saxophonist Marion Brown of recordingAscension with John Coltrane. “I don’t know how the engineers kept the screams out of the record.” For as much of a quest as it was to attain some higher understanding of improvisation, of music, of sound, Ascension was an aggressive, unpredictable free-for-all; a punk-rock nose-thumbing at what jazz should be. Following in the steps of Ornette Coleman, Coltrane explored the outer limits on Ascension, an album so subversive, so expectantly divisive that the original liner notes were basically a lengthy caveat from author A.B. Spellman. This was playing and thinking at its most free, and the 11-man ensemble who recorded Ascension held nothing back on its two takes. In the jumble, Ascension features some of the greatest, fiercest jazz solos of all time, notably tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders’ fire-tongued flutters on the second take, drummer Elvin Jones’ delicate cymbal rumbles and crashing snares on the first, and, of course, Coltrane’s own unpredictable runs on both. It’s a love extreme.
 K.G.
Apr 21, 2014 / 50 notes

ruiraiox:

John Coltrane - Ascension (Impulse!, 1966)
"The people who were in the studio were screaming," recalled alto saxophonist Marion Brown of recordingAscension with John Coltrane. “I don’t know how the engineers kept the screams out of the record.” For as much of a quest as it was to attain some higher understanding of improvisation, of music, of sound, Ascension was an aggressive, unpredictable free-for-all; a punk-rock nose-thumbing at what jazz should be. Following in the steps of Ornette Coleman, Coltrane explored the outer limits on Ascension, an album so subversive, so expectantly divisive that the original liner notes were basically a lengthy caveat from author A.B. Spellman. This was playing and thinking at its most free, and the 11-man ensemble who recorded Ascension held nothing back on its two takes. In the jumble, Ascension features some of the greatest, fiercest jazz solos of all time, notably tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders’ fire-tongued flutters on the second take, drummer Elvin Jones’ delicate cymbal rumbles and crashing snares on the first, and, of course, Coltrane’s own unpredictable runs on both. It’s a love extreme.
 K.G.

(via shabazzpizazz)

Apr 20, 2014 / 11,944 notes

shit-gets-real-when:

cooltallguy1202:

eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad

A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad,
Have no shame, you’re mine for good;
We share a sole insurgent fire,
We live in boundless brotherhood.

I do not fear the gibes of men;
One being split in two we dwell,
The kernel of a double nut
Embedded in a single shell.

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)

Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not.

The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.

But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here.

 

This is so cool!

i like this !!!!

Amor

(via drapetomaniakkk)

Apr 20, 2014 / 629 notes

blackmanonthemoon:

karamazove:

New Photos of John Coltrane Rediscovered 50 Years After. They Were Shot. During the recording of A Love Supreme in 1964, Chuck Stewart caught the jazz legend in his element. But 72 photographs from six rolls of film never made it beyond the contact-sheet stage, and so haven’t been published. Stewart’s son David recently rediscovered those images in his father’s collection, and now Stewart is scheduled to include some of them in a donation to the National Museum of American History this month.

Source: Smithsonian.com

King coltrane

(via arightontimeconscience)

Apr 20, 2014 / 4,760 notes

lascasartoris:

Easter Sunday (top-bottom)

  1. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  2. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  3. Harlem 1943 by Weegee
  4. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  5. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  6. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  7. South Side, Chicago,. 1941 by Edwin Rosskam
  8. Harlem 1940 by Weegee
  9. Harlem 1955 by William Klein
  10. Harlem (W. 117th St. and Seventh Ave) 1939

(via drapetomaniakkk)

buttondownmoda:

Currently reading.
Apr 20, 2014 / 62 notes

buttondownmoda:

Currently reading.

(via theblackcurator)

Apr 20, 2014 / 1,310 notes
abstrackafricana:

my mama on the far right (across from some ol’ salty, dateless ass muhfugga)
Apr 20, 2014 / 25 notes

abstrackafricana:

my mama on the far right (across from some ol’ salty, dateless ass muhfugga)

thoughtsofafallenpharaoh:

tilthisweek:

thetpr:


The first American Negro Ballet, 1937. 

Black Ballerinas

Flawless.

They’re giving life
Apr 20, 2014 / 13,129 notes

thoughtsofafallenpharaoh:

tilthisweek:

thetpr:

The first American Negro Ballet, 1937. 

Black Ballerinas

Flawless.

They’re giving life

(via sincerelyness)